Last update: Jan. 29, 2017

パラフィン

Low Risk for breastfeeding


Moderately safe. Probably compatible.
Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended.
Read the Comment.

Mineral oil, paraffin or petroleum jelly is a saturated hydrocarbon derived from petroleum. The length of molecular chain may range from 15 to 40 carbons with a molecular weight between 200 and 600 daltons.
It is used as a laxative, also in cosmetics, as emollient and as excipient in topical products for the skin.

LAXATIVE: Mineral oils with more than 34 carbons (480 daltons) are not absorbed, or, only have minimal absorption through the intestine being this a reason for which those are that should be used on humans (Hagemann 1998). Infant daily intake should be nil or less than 4 mg / kg. For oils with less than 25 carbons daily intake should not exceed 0.2 mg / kg.
When used as a laxative it has been suggested, (Mahadevan 2006), although weakly evidence based, that it may interfere with the absorption of liposoluble vitamins (Gattuso 1994).
Infants whose mothers received this treatment did not suffer any change on their usual bowel movements (Baldwin 1963).

COSMETICS as lotions and creams (body, hands or breast) and lipsticks are a source to accumulation of saturated hydrocarbons in body fat tissue (Concin 2011). Paraffin-containing breast creams significantly increase paraffin concentration in breastmilk (Noti 2003, Concin 2008) which is a reason to be avoided as they may increase the infant's daily intake to 40 mg / kg (Noti 2003).

During breastfeeding it should be wise to avoid the use of paraffin-containing creams and/or having them restricted to a minimum, not to apply them on the breast or only at least as possible when they are part of the excipient of an important topical treatment provided residual traces are been thoroughly removed before the next feeding at the breast. The use of mineral oil as a laxative should be replaced by other less risky product.

Local injection of paraffin for allegedly aesthetic purposes (breast augmentation or others) is a common practice in Eastern and Southeastern Asia, has often serious complications (Alagaratnam 1996, Zekri 1996, Ho 2001, Markopoulos 2006) which is a practice pending of eradication (Di Benedetto 2002). Although published data on it is lacking, it is presumed that paraffin concentrations in breastmilk would be greatly increased in these cases.

Alternatives

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

パラフィン is Liquid Paraffin in Japanese.

Is written in other languages:

パラフィン is also known as

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing パラフィン in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Oral Bioavail. 30-60 %

References

  1. AEMPS. Parafina (Hodernal). Ficha técnica. 2013 Full text (in our servers)
  2. Concin N, Hofstetter G, Plattner B, Tomovski C, Fiselier K, Gerritzen K, Semsroth S, Zeimet AG, Marth C, Siegl H, Rieger K, Ulmer H, Concin H, Grob K. Evidence for cosmetics as a source of mineral oil contamination in women. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2011 Abstract
  3. Irish. Liquid Paraffin Drug Summary. 2009 Full text (in our servers)
  4. Concin N, Hofstetter G, Plattner B, Tomovski C, Fiselier K, Gerritzen K, Fessler S, Windbichler G, Zeimet A, Ulmer H, Siegl H, Rieger K, Concin H, Grob K. Mineral oil paraffins in human body fat and milk. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008 Abstract
  5. Markopoulos C, Mantas D, Kouskos E, Antonopoulou Z, Revenas C, Yiacoumettis A. Paraffinomas of the breast or oleogranulomatous mastitis-a rare entity. Breast. 2006 Abstract
  6. Mahadevan U, Kane S. American gastroenterological association institute technical review on the use of gastrointestinal medications in pregnancy. Gastroenterology. 2006 Jul;131(1):283-311. Review. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Noti A, Grob K, Biedermann M, Deiss U, Brüschweiler BJ. Exposure of babies to C15-C45 mineral paraffins from human milk and breast salves. Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2003 Abstract
  8. Di Benedetto G, Pierangeli M, Scalise A, Bertani A. Paraffin oil injection in the body: an obsolete and destructive procedure. Ann Plast Surg. 2002 Abstract
  9. Ho WS, Chan AC, Law BK. Management of paraffinoma of the breast: 10 years' experience. Br J Plast Surg. 2001 Abstract
  10. Hagemann TM. Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding. J Hum Lact. 1998 Sep;14(3):259-62. Review. Abstract
  11. Zekri A, Ho WS, King WW. [Destructive paraffinoma of the breast and thoracic wall caused by paraffin injection for mammary increase. Apropos of 3 cases with review of the literature]. Ann Chir Plast Esthet. 1996 Abstract
  12. Alagaratnam TT, Ng WF. Paraffinomas of the breast: an oriental curiosity. Aust N Z J Surg. 1996 Abstract
  13. Gattuso JM, Kamm MA. Adverse effects of drugs used in the management of constipation and diarrhoea. Drug Saf. 1994 Abstract
  14. BALDWIN WF. Clinical Study of Senna Administration to Nursing Mothers: Assessment of Effects on Infant Bowel Habits. Can Med Assoc J. 1963 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)

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