Last update: June 15, 2019

Клиндамицин

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Lincosamide antibacterial.
Oral, intramuscular or intravenous administration in 3 to 4 daily doses.

Excreted in non-significant level into breast milk (Zhang 1997, Matsuda 1984, Stéen 1982, Smith 1975).
Except for few cases of enterocolitis due to disturbance of intestinal flora no other harm effects have been shown in breastfed infants. All cases spontaneously cured after discontinuation of medication.

One reported case (Mann 1980) of pseudomembrane colitis in an infant whose mother was on clindamicin and gentamicin.

Be aware of false negative results of bacterial cultures obtained from febrile infants whose mothers are on antibiotics, as well as the possibility of gastroenteritis due to altered intestinal flora (Ito 1993).

Expert authors consider the use of this medication safe or probably safe during breastfeeding (Hale 2019, Briggs 2017, Amir 2014 y 2011, Mitrano 2009, Spencer 2008, Schaefer 2007).
American Academy of Pediatrics: medication usually compatible with breastfeeding (AAP 2001).

Alternatives

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Клиндамицин is Clindamycin in Cyrillic.

Is written in other languages:

Клиндамицин is also known as

Group

Клиндамицин belongs to this group or family:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Клиндамицин in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Bioavailability 90 %
Molecular weight 425 daltons
Protein Binding 94 %
VD 2 l/Kg
Tmax 0,75 - 1 hours
T1/2 2,4 hours
M/P ratio 0,5 -
Theoretical Dose 0,2 - 0,47 mg/Kg/d
Relative Dose 0,6 - 5 %
Relat.Ped.Dose 1 - 5 %

References

  1. Hale TW. Hale's Medications & Mothers' Milk. Springer Publishing Company. 2019
  2. Briggs GG, Freeman RK, Towers CV, Forinash AB. Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation: A Reference Guide to Fetal and Neonatal Risk. Wolters Kluwer Health. 11th edition (acces on line) 2017
  3. Butler DC, Heller MM, Murase JE. Safety of dermatologic medications in pregnancy and lactation: Part II. Lactation. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Mar;70(3):417.e1-10; quiz 427. Abstract
  4. Amir LH. ABM Clinical Protocol #4: Mastitis, Revised March 2014. Breastfeed Med. 2014 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. Kong YL, Tey HL. Treatment of acne vulgaris during pregnancy and lactation. Drugs. 2013 Abstract
  6. Amir LH, Pirotta MV, Raval M. Breastfeeding--evidence based guidelines for the use of medicines. Aust Fam Physician. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Mitrano JA, Spooner LM, Belliveau P. Excretion of antimicrobials used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections during lactation: safety in breastfeeding infants. Pharmacotherapy. 2009 Sep;29(9):1103-9. Abstract
  8. Spencer JP. Management of mastitis in breastfeeding women. Am Fam Physician. 2008 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. Schaefer C, Peters P, Miller RK. Drugs During Pregnancy and Lactation. Treatment options and risk assessment. Elsevier, second edition. London. 2007
  10. Worret WI, Fluhr JW. [Acne therapy with topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics and azelaic acid]. J Dtsch Dermatol Ges. 2006 Abstract
  11. Nahum GG, Uhl K, Kennedy DL. Antibiotic use in pregnancy and lactation: what is and is not known about teratogenic and toxic risks. Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Abstract
  12. WHO / UNICEF. BREASTFEEDING AND MATERNAL MEDICATION Recommendations for Drugs in the Eleventh WHO Model List of Essential Drugs. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development (WHO/UNICEF) 2002 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  13. AAP - American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Drugs. Transfer of drugs and other chemicals into human milk. Pediatrics. 2001 Sep;108(3):776-89. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  14. Chin KG, McPherson CE 3rd, Hoffman M, Kuchta A, Mactal-Haaf C. Use of anti-infective agents during lactation: Part 2--Aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, and metronidazole. J Hum Lact. 2001 Feb;17(1):54-65. Abstract
  15. Zhang Y, Zhang Q, Xu Z. [Tissue and body fluid distribution of antibacterial agents in pregnant and lactating women]. Zhonghua Fu Chan Ke Za Zhi. 1997 Abstract
  16. Ito S, Blajchman A, Stephenson M, Eliopoulos C, Koren G. Prospective follow-up of adverse reactions in breast-fed infants exposed to maternal medication. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993 May;168(5):1393-9. Abstract
  17. Matsuda S. Transfer of antibiotics into maternal milk. Biol Res Pregnancy Perinatol. 1984;5(2):57-60. Abstract
  18. Stéen B, Rane A. Clindamycin passage into human milk. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1982 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  19. Mann CF. Clindamycin and breast-feeding. Pediatrics. 1980 Abstract
  20. Smith JA, Morgan JR, Rachlis AR, Papsin FR. Clindamycin in human breast milk. Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Abstract Full text (in our servers)

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