Last update Oct. 23, 2022

Romarin

Low Risk

Possibly safe. Probably compatible. Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended. Read the Comment.

Leaves and floral summits of shrub are used. It contains essential oil (eucalyptol, camphor), flavonoids, terpene. Scientifically non-proven effects: digestive, carminative, cholagogue. Oral use and topically used as anti-inflammatory and antiseptic.

At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found.

Herb that is widely used as a condiment for culinary purposes and also as infusion for medicinal purposes. In some cultures (Eastern Europe), it is often consumed in pregnancy without reported harm effects.

Eucalyptol is neurotoxic and may induce seizures (Burkhard 1999). The varieties from the Maghreb have a high content of eucalyptol. Eucalyptol is excreted in breast milk in small amounts (Kirsch 2012), although it does not cause problems or cause rejection in infants. (Kirsch 2013)

An occasional consumption of infusion would be compatible with breastfeeding. There is no risk of topical use and consumption as a condiment at usual doses.

The essence of Rosemary or essential oil would better be avoided while breastfeeding because of the convulsant property of Camphor. Alcoholic solutions (vg. rosemary alcohol) should be avoided near the chest and areas in contact with the infant.

Precautions when taking plant preparations (Anderson 2017, Powers 2015, Posadzki 2013, Efferth 2011, Kopec 1999, Hsu 1995):

  • Make sure they are from a reliable source: poisonings have occurred due to confusion of one plant with another with toxic properties (Hsu 1995), poisonings due to containing heavy metals extracted from the soil, and food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi. (Anderson 2017)
  • Do not take in excess; follow the recommendations of expert phytotherapy professionals. “Natural” products are not good in any quantity: plants contain active substances from which much of our traditional pharmacopoeia has been obtained and can cause poisoning or act as endocrine disruptors if consumed in quantity or for an exaggerated time because they contain phytoestrogens. (Powers 2015, Zava 1998)

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Romarin.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM team of health professionals, and are based on updated scientific publications. It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it. The pharmaceutical industry contraindicates breastfeeding, mistakenly and without scientific reasons, in most of the drug data sheets.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Romarin is Rosemary in French.

Is written in other languages:

Romarin is also known as

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Romarin in its composition:

  • Alcohol de Romero™. Contains other elements than Romarin in its composition
  • Fladozum™. Contains other elements than Romarin in its composition
  • Optomega™. Contains other elements than Romarin in its composition

References

  1. Anderson PO. Herbal Use During Breastfeeding. Breastfeed Med. 2017 Abstract
  2. Powers CN, Setzer WN. A molecular docking study of phytochemical estrogen mimics from dietary herbal supplements. In Silico Pharmacol. 2015 Mar 22;3:4. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Kennedy DA, Lupattelli A, Koren G, Nordeng H. Herbal medicine use in pregnancy: results of a multinational study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Posadzki P, Watson LK, Ernst E. Adverse effects of herbal medicines: an overview of systematic reviews. Clin Med (Lond). 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source)
  5. Kirsch F, Horst K, Rohrig W, et al. Tracing metabolite profiles in human milk: Studies on the odorant 1,8-cineole transferred into breast milk after oral intake. Metabolomics. 2013;3:47–71
  6. Posadzki P, Watson L, Ernst E. Contamination and adulteration of herbal medicinal products (HMPs): an overview of systematic reviews. Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2013 Abstract
  7. Kirsch F, Beauchamp J, Buettner A. Time-dependent aroma changes in breast milk after oral intake of a pharmacological preparation containing 1,8-cineole. Clin Nutr. 2012 Abstract
  8. Efferth T, Kaina B. Toxicities by herbal medicines with emphasis to traditional Chinese medicine. Curr Drug Metab. 2011 Abstract
  9. Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products. Community herbal monograph on Rosmarinus officinalis. EMA. 2010 Full text (in our servers)
  10. WHO. World Health Organization. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume 4. WHO monographs. 2009 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  11. Burkhard PR, Burkhardt K, Haenggeli CA, Landis T. Plant-induced seizures: reappearance of an old problem. J Neurol. 1999 Aug;246(8):667-70. Abstract
  12. Kopec K. Herbal medications and breastfeeding. J Hum Lact. 1999 Jun;15(2):157-61. Review. No abstract available. Abstract
  13. Zava DT, Dollbaum CM, Blen M. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1998 Abstract
  14. Hsu CK, Leo P, Shastry D, Meggs W, Weisman R, Hoffman RS. Anticholinergic poisoning associated with herbal tea. Arch Intern Med. 1995 Abstract

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