Last update: July 21, 2017

Soy

Low Risk for breastfeeding


Moderately safe. Probably compatible.
Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended.
Read the Comment.

Seeds, oil and extracts of this plant contain Lecithin and Isoflavones like Genistein, Glycitein and Daidzein.

Lecithin is formed by phospholipids with hypolipidemic properties (see particular information on LECITHIN). Isoflavones are phytoestrogens which is a property that is being used for treatment of hyperlipidemias and disorders related to menopause.

Ingestion of soy derived products by nursing mothers may be a cause of increase concentration in the mother’s plasma, breast milk and infant’s urine.

Despite of that soy has been consumed from ancient times by Asian population and could offer some benefit for the welfare, it may act as hormonal disruptor on the endocrine system, especially is the product contains Bisphenol, hence, high exposition during infancy should be avoided.

Therefore, it is not recommended an extensive consumption of it while breastfeeding since estrogens may decrease, at least theoretically, the milk production.


See below the information of this related product:

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Soy.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Group

Soy belongs to this group or family:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Soy in its composition:

References

  1. Katchy A, Pinto C, Jonsson P, Nguyen-Vu T, Pandelova M, Riu A, Schramm KW, Samarov D, Gustafsson JÅ, Bondesson M, Williams C. Coexposure to phytoestrogens and bisphenol a mimics estrogenic effects in an additive manner. Toxicol Sci. 2014 Abstract
  2. Adgent MA, Daniels JL, Rogan WJ, Adair L, Edwards LJ, Westreich D, Maisonet M, Marcus M. Early-life soy exposure and age at menarche. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2012 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Jarrell J, Foster WG, Kinniburgh DW. Phytoestrogens in human pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol Int. 2012 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Barthold JS, Hossain J, Olivant-Fisher A, Reilly A, Figueroa TE, Banihani A, Hagerty J, González R, Noh PH, Manson JM. Altered infant feeding patterns in boys with acquired nonsyndromic cryptorchidism. Birth Defects Res A Clin Mol Teratol. 2012 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. Maskarinec G, Ollberding NJ, Conroy SM, Morimoto Y, Pagano IS, Franke AA, Gentzschein E, Stanczyk FZ. Estrogen levels in nipple aspirate fluid and serum during a randomized soy trial. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Zung A, Glaser T, Kerem Z, Zadik Z. Breast development in the first 2 years of life: an association with soy-based infant formulas. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2008 Abstract
  7. Franke AA, Halm BM, Custer LJ, Tatsumura Y, Hebshi S. Isoflavones in breastfed infants after mothers consume soy. Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  8. Thompson LU, Boucher BA, Liu Z, Cotterchio M, Kreiger N. Phytoestrogen content of foods consumed in Canada, including isoflavones, lignans, and coumestan. Nutr Cancer. 2006 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. Scott CR. Lecithin: it isn't just for plugged milk ducts and mastitis anymore. Midwifery Today Int Midwife. 2005 Abstract
  10. Fletcher RJ. Food sources of phyto-oestrogens and their precursors in Europe. Br J Nutr. 2003 Abstract
  11. Stark A, Madar Z. Phytoestrogens: a review of recent findings. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Abstract
  12. Badger TM, Ronis MJ, Hakkak R, Rowlands JC, Korourian S. The health consequences of early soy consumption. J Nutr. 2002 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  13. Franke AA, Custer LJ, Tanaka Y. Isoflavones in human breast milk and other biological fluids. Am J Clin Nutr. 1998 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  14. Zava DT, Dollbaum CM, Blen M. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1998 Abstract
  15. Slavin J. More information on phytoestrogens in breast milk. Clin Chem. 1997 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  16. Sheehan DM. Isoflavone content of breast milk and soy formulas: benefits and risks. Clin Chem. 1997 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  17. Slavin JL. Phytoestrogens in breast milk--another advantage of breast-feeding? Clin Chem. 1996 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)

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