Last update: Jan. 21, 2017

Peppermint

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Herb which is widely used by many cultures. It has been used even for pain relief during pregnancy and colicky pain in fussy babies (without proved data on this).

Since it is non toxic at appropriate dose and a tiny excretion into breast milk of active metabolite Menthol, a moderate consumption is believed compatible while breastfeeding.

Dessicated leaves and essential oil of the plant that contains Menthol are used.

Properties that have been demonstrated and approved indications are: as spasmolytic for Dyspepsia, Irritable Colon and flatulence. It has been used for the treatment of cracked nipple with best results than placebo or Lanolin.

Although with no proven effectiveness, it is traditionally used for cough relief, common cold, pain or itching by local application or inhalation.

Overdosing of essential oil may be harmful.

Do not expose infants to inhalation of products that contain Menthol (irritation of the air way)

In case of use on the nipple, do it after feeding the baby and cleanse thoroughly the surface before the next one.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Peppermint is also known as


Peppermint in other languages or writings:

Groups

Peppermint belongs to these groups or families:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Peppermint in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Theoretical Dose 0,0009 mg/Kg/d

References

  1. Shanazi M, Farshbaf Khalili A, Kamalifard M, Asghari Jafarabadi M, Masoudin K, Esmaeli F. Comparison of the Effects of Lanolin, Peppermint, and Dexpanthenol Creams on Treatment of Traumatic Nipples in Breastfeeding Mothers. J Caring Sci. 2015 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Eglash A. Treatment of maternal hypergalactia. Breastfeed Med. 2014 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Sim TF, Sherriff J, Hattingh HL, Parsons R, Tee LB. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Kennedy DA, Lupattelli A, Koren G, Nordeng H. Herbal medicine use in pregnancy: results of a multinational study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. WHO. World Health Organization. WHO monographs on medicinal plants commonly used in the Newly Independent States (NIS). WHO monographs. 2010 Full text (in our servers)
  6. Abdulrazzaq YM, Al Kendi A, Nagelkerke N. Soothing methods used to calm a baby in an Arab country. Acta Paediatr. 2009 Abstract
  7. Hausner H, Bredie WL, Mølgaard C, Petersen MA, Møller P. Differential transfer of dietary flavour compounds into human breast milk. Physiol Behav. 2008 Sep 3;95(1-2):118-24. Abstract
  8. Cal K, Sopala M. Ex vivo skin absorption of terpenes from Vicks VapoRub ointment. Med Sci Monit. 2008 Abstract
  9. Sayyah Melli M, Rashidi MR, Delazar A, Madarek E, Kargar Maher MH, Ghasemzadeh A, Sadaghat K, Tahmasebi Z. Effect of peppermint water on prevention of nipple cracks in lactating primiparous women: a randomized controlled trial. Int Breastfeed J. 2007 Abstract
  10. Melli MS, Rashidi MR, Nokhoodchi A, Tagavi S, Farzadi L, Sadaghat K, Tahmasebi Z, Sheshvan MK. A randomized trial of peppermint gel, lanolin ointment, and placebo gel to prevent nipple crack in primiparous breastfeeding women. Med Sci Monit. 2007 Abstract
  11. Crotteau CA, Wright ST, Eglash A. Clinical inquiries. What is the best treatment for infants with colic? J Fam Pract. 2006 Abstract
  12. Martin D, Valdez J, Boren J, Mayersohn M. Dermal absorption of camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate in humans. J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Abstract
  13. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume 2. WHO monographs. 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)

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