Last update: Sept. 29, 2015

Lavender

Low Risk for breastfeeding


Moderately safe. Probably compatible.
Mild risk possible. Follow up recommended.
Read the Comment.

Flowers are used for infusion, also oral and inhaled liquid preparations, and essential oil.
The essential oil contains flavonoids, linalyl (45%), linalool (45%) and small amounts of camphor (1%) eucalyptol (2%).
Properties attributed by the traditional use without definite evidence are: antispasmodic, sedative and anxiolytic. Neither it has been demonstrated their effectiveness as an abortive substance.
It is usually used as tranquilizer to calm topically local pain and through inhalation for aromatherapy purposes. There is a moderate evidence of efficacy in pain relief during and after delivery and cesarean and menstrual pain.

The essential oil has mild estrogenic and antiandrogenic effect, with capacity to behave as endocrine disruptor, being important not to apply it on the chest to prevent ingestion by the infant. There have been reports of transient gynecomastia in children after topical application of essential oil as cosmetic.

At last update, there were not found published data on excretion in breast milk.
Given the lack of toxicity, as reported, moderate consumption of lavender flowers in infusion during lactation, has little or no risk.

In addition to the estrogenic effect of essential oil, it is known that the eucalyptol is excreted into milk, so that consumption of essential oil should be moderate or nil during lactation since, although contained in small amount, it is neurotoxic and convulsive.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Lavender in other languages or writings:

Groups

Lavender belongs to these groups or families:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Lavender in its composition:

  • Sedasor™. Contains other elements than Lavender in its composition

References

  1. Effati-Daryani F, Mohammad-Alizadeh-Charandabi S, Mirghafourvand M, Taghizadeh M, Mohammadi A. Effect of Lavender Cream with or without Foot-bath on Anxiety, Stress and Depression in Pregnancy: a Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial. J Caring Sci. 2015 Abstract
  2. Diaz A, Luque L, Badar Z, Kornic S, Danon M. Prepubertal gynecomastia and chronic lavender exposure: report of three cases. J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Abstract
  3. Fisher MM, Eugster EA. What is in our environment that effects puberty? Reprod Toxicol. 2014 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Kirsch F, Beauchamp J, Buettner A. Time-dependent aroma changes in breast milk after oral intake of a pharmacological preparation containing 1,8-cineole. Clin Nutr. 2012 Abstract
  5. EMA. Lavender oil. Lavandula angustifolia Mill., aetheroleum. Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC). 2012 Full text (in our servers)
  6. EMA. Community herbal monograph on Lavandula angustifolia Miller, flos. Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC). 2012 Full text (in our servers)
  7. EMA. Community herbal monograph on Lavandula angustifolia Miller, aetheroleum. Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC). 2012 Full text (in our servers)
  8. Sheikhan F, Jahdi F, Khoei EM, Shamsalizadeh N, Sheikhan M, Haghani H. Episiotomy pain relief: Use of Lavender oil essence in primiparous Iranian women. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2012 Abstract
  9. Block SL. The possible link between gynecomastia, topical lavender, and tea tree oil. Pediatr Ann. 2012 Abstract Full text (in our servers)
  10. Ou MC, Hsu TF, Lai AC, Lin YT, Lin CC. Pain relief assessment by aromatic essential oil massage on outpatients with primary dysmenorrhea: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial. J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 2012 Abstract
  11. Jones C. The efficacy of lavender oil on perineal trauma: a review of the evidence. Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2011 Abstract
  12. Hadi N, Hanid AA. Lavender essence for post-cesarean pain. Pak J Biol Sci. 2011 Abstract
  13. Henley DV, Lipson N, Korach KS, Bloch CA. Prepubertal gynecomastia linked to lavender and tea tree oils. N Engl J Med. 2007 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  14. Kemper KJ, Romm AJ, Gardiner P. Prepubertal gynecomastia linked to lavender and tea tree oils. N Engl J Med. 2007 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  15. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume 3. p 338-348. WHO monographs. 2007 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  16. Habanananda T. Non-pharmacological pain relief in labour. J Med Assoc Thai. 2004 Abstract
  17. Cornwell S, Dale A. Lavender oil and perineal repair. Mod Midwife. 1995 Abstract

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