Last update: July 2, 2015

Insulin

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Insulin is a component present in breast milk that helps to lower the risk for Diabetes Mellitus Type I among breastfed infants.

A small quantity of insulin is absorbed orally which is a factor that promotes maturation of the intestine, induces glucose tolerance and prevents development of Diabetes type 1.

Insulin requirements decrease about 25% after birth in diabetic mothers who breastfeed their babies. Those mothers are in need of higher self-control of disease, and, higher caloric intake is required (500 to 800 kcal/day).

Attachment and nursing should be started as soon as possible since second stage of Lactogenesis may be delayed in diabetic mothers.

Diabetic mothers who breastfeed would attain a better metabolic control of the disease while breastfeeding.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Insulin since it is relatively safe.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Insulin in other languages or writings:

Group

Insulin belongs to this group or family:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Insulin in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Oral Bioavail. 0 %
Molecular weight 5808 daltons
Protein Binding 5 %
M/P ratio 0 -

References

  1. Serrano Aguayo P, García de Quirós Muñoz JM, Bretón Lesmes I, Cózar León MV. Tratamiento de enfermedades endocrinológicas durante la lactancia. [Endocrinologic diseases management during breastfeeding.] Med Clin (Barc). 2015 Abstract
  2. Matias SL, Dewey KG, Quesenberry CP Jr, Gunderson EP. Maternal prepregnancy obesity and insulin treatment during pregnancy are independently associated with delayed lactogenesis in women with recent gestational diabetes mellitus. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Rowe H, Baker T, Hale TW. Maternal medication, drug use, and breastfeeding. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2013 Feb;60(1):275-94. Abstract
  4. Gunderson EP, Hedderson MM, Chiang V, Crites Y, Walton D, Azevedo RA, Fox G, Elmasian C, Young S, Salvador N, Lum M, Quesenberry CP, Lo JC, Sternfeld B, Ferrara A, Selby JV. Lactation intensity and postpartum maternal glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in women with recent GDM: the SWIFT cohort. Diabetes Care. 2012 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. O'Reilly MW, Avalos G, Dennedy MC, O'Sullivan EP, Dunne F. Atlantic DIP: high prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance post partum is reduced by breast-feeding in women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus. Eur J Endocrinol. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Da Costa TH, Bluck LJ. High lactation index is associated with insulin sensitivity. J Nutr Biochem. 2011 Abstract
  7. Riviello C, Mello G, Jovanovic LG. Breastfeeding and the basal insulin requirement in type 1 diabetic women. Endocr Pract. 2009 Abstract
  8. Hummel S, Winkler C, Schoen S, Knopff A, Marienfeld S, Bonifacio E, Ziegler AG. Breastfeeding habits in families with Type 1 diabetes. Diabet Med. 2007 Abstract
  9. Stage E, Nørgård H, Damm P, Mathiesen E. Long-term breast-feeding in women with type 1 diabetes. Diabetes Care. 2006 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  10. WHO / UNICEF. BREASTFEEDING AND MATERNAL MEDICATION Recommendations for Drugs in the Eleventh WHO Model List of Essential Drugs. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development (WHO/UNICEF) 2002 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  11. Shehadeh N, Shamir R, Berant M, Etzioni A. Insulin in human milk and the prevention of type 1 diabetes. Pediatr Diabetes. 2001 Abstract
  12. Knudsen A, Pedersen H, Klebe JG. Impact of smoking on the duration of breastfeeding in mothers with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Acta Paediatr. 2001 Abstract
  13. Nice FJ, Snyder JL, Kotansky BC. Breastfeeding and over-the-counter medications. J Hum Lact. 2000 Nov;16(4):319-31. Review. Erratum in: J Hum Lact 2001 Feb;17(1):90. Abstract
  14. Neubauer SH, Ferris AM, Chase CG, Fanelli J, Thompson CA, Lammi-Keefe CJ, Clark RM, Jensen RG, Bendel RB, Green KW. Delayed lactogenesis in women with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  15. Ostrom KM, Ferris AM. Prolactin concentrations in serum and milk of mothers with and without insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  16. Davies HA, Clark JD, Dalton KJ, Edwards OM. Insulin requirements of diabetic women who breast feed. BMJ. 1989 Abstract
  17. Ferris AM, Dalidowitz CK, Ingardia CM, Reece EA, Fumia FD, Jensen RG, Allen LH. Lactation outcome in insulin-dependent diabetic women. J Am Diet Assoc. 1988 Abstract

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e-lactancia is a resource recommended by Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine from United States of America

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