Last update: Feb. 8, 2015

Indian Pennywort

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

At latest update, relevant published data on excretion into breast milk were not found.

It contains triterpenic saponins (asiaticoside and madecassoside), tannins, phytosterols and essential oil.

Frequent and exaggerated use of triterpenes may cause liver damage.

Properties that are attributed for topical use (some clinically tested) like are healing of wound and venous tonic. There is no proof on effectiveness when used by mouth.

Because of a low or nil systemic absorption through skin or vaginal mucosa, the topical use is believed be compatible with breastfeeding. Do not use it on the breast or clean it thoroughly to avoid ingestion by the infant.

Avoid oral administration.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Indian Pennywort since it is relatively safe.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Indian Pennywort is also known as


Groups

Indian Pennywort belongs to these groups or families:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Indian Pennywort in its composition:

References

  1. Martinez-Zapata MJ, Vernooij RW, Uriona Tuma SM, Stein AT, Moreno RM, Vargas E, Capellà D, Bonfill Cosp X. Phlebotonics for venous insufficiency. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016 Abstract
  2. Bunchorntavakul C, Reddy KR. Review article: herbal and dietary supplement hepatotoxicity. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Lamxay V, de Boer HJ, Björk L. Traditions and plant use during pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum recovery by the Kry ethnic group in Lao PDR. J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Dantuluri S, North-Lewis P, Karthik SV. Gotu Kola induced hepatotoxicity in a child - need for caution with alternative remedies. Dig Liver Dis. 2011 Abstract
  5. Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC). Assessment report on Centella asiatica. EMA/HMPC. 2010 Full text (in our servers)
  6. Chitturi S, Farrell GC. Hepatotoxic slimming aids and other herbal hepatotoxins. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Abstract Full text (in our servers)
  7. Jorge OA, Jorge AD. Hepatotoxicity associated with the ingestion of Centella asiatica. Rev Esp Enferm Dig. 2005 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  8. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume I. WHO monographs 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)

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