Last update: Nov. 25, 2014

Cinnamon

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

The bark of tender branches is used. Constituents are Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol. There are not clinical trials that would had supported any property that may mean a benefit for health, as those traditionally assigned to Cinnamon like spasmolytic, carminative and anti-diarrheal ones.

At latest update relevant published data on its excretion into breast milk were not found.

Cinnamon is commonly used as spice and flavoring for food and infusions. Out of occasional irritation on skin and mucosa, there is a lack of toxicity and side-effects at the usual dosage. Do not overcome the usual amount used for food preparation.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Cinnamon since it is relatively safe.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Cinnamon is also known as


Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Cinnamon in its composition:

  • Agua del Carmen™. Contains other elements than Cinnamon in its composition
  • Digestion Calming Drops™. Contains other elements than Cinnamon in its composition
  • Eau des Carmes (Belgium)™. Contains other elements than Cinnamon in its composition
  • Pervivo™. Contains other elements than Cinnamon in its composition
  • Relaxcol™. Contains other elements than Cinnamon in its composition

References

  1. Ranasinghe P, Pigera S, Premakumara GA, Galappaththy P, Constantine GR, Katulanda P. Medicinal properties of 'true' cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum): a systematic review. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume I. WHO monographs 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Perry PA, Dean BS, Krenzelok EP. Cinnamon oil abuse by adolescents. Vet Hum Toxicol. 1990 Abstract
  4. Pilapil VR. Toxic manifestations of cinnamon oil ingestion in a child. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1989 Abstract

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