Last update: Jan. 15, 2019

Chamomile

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

There are two different camomile species with similar properties, the ordinary or sweet camomile (Matricaria recutita or Chamomilla recutita) and Roman, English or bitter camomile, (Anthemis nobilis or Chamaemelum nobile).
The inflorescence is used. It contains essential oils, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, lactones and tannins.
Properties attributed to it when taken orally: antispasmodic, digestive, anti-inflammatory and sedative, and a cutaneous anti-inflammatory when taken locally (EMA 2015 and 2011, WHO 2010 and 1999). There is a lack of scientific evidence of its properties as a sedative (Yurcheshen 2015).
It is also used as a galactogogue (Sim 2013) without evidence of its effectiveness except for some anecdotal reports (Silva 2018).

Since the last update we have not found published data on its excretion in breastmilk.

Some of its components are known to diffuse well in breastmilk, because infants breastfed by mothers who were taking camomile, later recognized the smell of camomile (Delaunay 2010 and 2006).

This plant is widely used in many cultures (Consolini 2010), even during pregnancy (Kennedy 2013, Cuzzolin 2010, Nordeng 2004) and in infants to calm colic and other problems (Zhang 2011, Abdulrazzaq 2009, Crotteau 2006, Savino 2005).

Given its lack of toxicity at usual doses, moderate consumption is considered compatible with breastfeeding (Briggs 2017, The Royal 2013, Amir 2011).

The best galactogogue is frequent on-demand breastfeeding with correct technique in a mother who maintains her self-confidence (Mannion 2012, Forinash 2012, ABM 2018 and 2011).

Precautions when taking plant preparations:
1. Ensure that they are from reliable source: poisoning has occurred due to confusion of one plant with another with toxic properties, poisonings from heavy metals that are extracted from the soil and food poisoning due to contamination with bacteria or fungi (Anderson 2017).
2. Do not take too much; follow recommendations from experienced phytotherapy professionals. "Natural" products are not good in any quantity: plants contain active substances from which a large part of our traditional pharmacopoeia has been obtained and can cause intoxication or act as endocrine disruptors (they contain phytoestrogens: Powers 2015, Zava 1998) if they are taken in exaggerated quantities or over extended time periods.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Chamomile is also known as


Chamomile in other languages or writings:

Groups

Chamomile belongs to these groups or families:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Chamomile in its composition:

References

  1. ABM: Brodribb W. ABM Clinical Protocol #9: Use of Galactogogues in Initiating or Augmenting Maternal Milk Production, Second Revision 2018. Breastfeed Med. 2018 Jun;13(5):307-314 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Silva FV, Dias F, Costa G, Campos MDG. Chamomile reveals to be a potent galactogogue: the unexpected effect. J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2018 Abstract
  3. Anderson PO. Herbal Use During Breastfeeding. Breastfeed Med. 2017 Abstract
  4. Powers CN, Setzer WN. A molecular docking study of phytochemical estrogen mimics from dietary herbal supplements. In Silico Pharmacol. 2015 Mar 22;3:4. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. Yurcheshen M, Seehuus M, Pigeon W. Updates on Nutraceutical Sleep Therapeutics and Investigational Research. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2015 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. EMA. European Union herbal monograph on Matricaria recutita L., aetheroleum. 2015 Full text (in our servers)
  7. EMA. European Union herbal monograph on Matricaria recutita L., flow. 2015 Full text (in our servers)
  8. Sim TF, Sherriff J, Hattingh HL, Parsons R, Tee LB. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. Kennedy DA, Lupattelli A, Koren G, Nordeng H. Herbal medicine use in pregnancy: results of a multinational study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  10. The Royal Women’s Hospital Victoria Australia. Herbal and Traditional Medicines in Breasfeeding. Fact Sheet. 2013 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  11. Forinash AB, Yancey AM, Barnes KN, Myles TD. The use of galactogogues in the breastfeeding mother. Ann Pharmacother. 2012 Oct;46(10):1392-404. Abstract
  12. Mannion C, Mansell D. Breastfeeding self-efficacy and the use of prescription medication: a pilot study. Obstet Gynecol Int. 2012;2012:562704. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  13. ABM. Comité de Protocolos de la Academia Médica de Lactancia Materna. ABM Protocolo Clínico #9: Uso de Galactogogos para Iniciar o aumentar la tasa de secreción de Leche Materna. Breastfeed Med. 2011 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  14. Amir LH, Pirotta MV, Raval M. Breastfeeding--evidence based guidelines for the use of medicines. Aust Fam Physician. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  15. EMA - Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC) Community herbal monograph on Chamaemelum mobile. 2011 Full text (in our servers)
  16. Zhang Y, Fein EB, Fein SB. Feeding of dietary botanical supplements and teas to infants in the United States. Pediatrics. 2011 Abstract
  17. Delaunay-El Allam M, Soussignan R, Patris B, Marlier L, Schaal B. Long-lasting memory for an odor acquired at the mother's breast. Dev Sci. 2010 Abstract
  18. Cuzzolin L, Francini-Pesenti F, Verlato G, Joppi M, Baldelli P, Benoni G. Use of herbal products among 392 Italian pregnant women: focus on pregnancy outcome. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2010 Abstract
  19. WHO. World Health Organization. WHO monographs on medicinal plants commonly used in the Newly Independent States (NIS). WHO monographs. 2010 Full text (in our servers)
  20. Abdulrazzaq YM, Al Kendi A, Nagelkerke N. Soothing methods used to calm a baby in an Arab country. Acta Paediatr. 2009 Abstract
  21. Crotteau CA, Wright ST, Eglash A. Clinical inquiries. What is the best treatment for infants with colic? J Fam Pract. 2006 Abstract
  22. Delaunay-El Allam M, Marlier L, Schaal B. Learning at the breast: preference formation for an artificial scent and its attraction against the odor of maternal milk. Infant Behav Dev. 2006 Abstract
  23. Savino F, Cresi F, Castagno E, Silvestro L, Oggero R. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of a standardized extract of Matricariae recutita, Foeniculum vulgare and Melissa officinalis (ColiMil) in the treatment of breastfed colicky infants. Phytother Res. 2005 Abstract
  24. Nordeng H, Havnen GC. Use of herbal drugs in pregnancy: a survey among 400 Norwegian women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2004 Abstract
  25. WHO. World Health Organization. Geneva. WHO monographs on selected medicinal plants. Volume I. WHO monographs 1999 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  26. Zava DT, Dollbaum CM, Blen M. Estrogen and progestin bioactivity of foods, herbs, and spices. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1998 Abstract
  27. McGeorge BC, Steele MC. Allergic contact dermatitis of the nipple from Roman chamomile ointment. Contact Dermatitis. 1991 Abstract

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