Last update: May 1, 2016

βανκομυκίνη

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

Antibacterial glycopeptide drug.

A high molecular weight its a reason to be excreted in clinically non-significant amount into breast milk, much lower than the dose commonly used for infection in newborns and infants.
Its low oral bioavailability hinders the passage toward infant’s plasma from ingested mother’s milk, except in preterm infants and immediate neonatal period, in which the infant may have an increased intestinal permeability.

Take into account the possibility of negative results of bacterial cultures from febrile infants when their mothers are receiving antibiotics.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for βανκομυκίνη since it is relatively safe.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

βανκομυκίνη is Vancomycin in Greek.

Is written in other languages:

Group

βανκομυκίνη belongs to this group or family:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing βανκομυκίνη in its composition:

Pharmacokinetics

Variable Value Unit
Oral Bioavail. 0 %
Molecular weight 1449 daltons
Protein Binding 10 - 55 %
VD 0,4 - 1 l/Kg
T1/2 4 - 6 hours
M/P ratio 1 -
Theoretical Dose 1,9 mg/Kg/d
Relative Dose 4,8 - 6,7 %
Relat.Ped.Dose 4,8 - 6,3 %

References

  1. Amir LH. ABM Clinical Protocol #4: Mastitis, Revised March 2014. Breastfeed Med. 2014 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Rao S, Kupfer Y, Pagala M, Chapnick E, Tessler S. Systemic absorption of oral vancomycin in patients with Clostridium difficile infection. Scand J Infect Dis. 2011 Abstract
  3. Amir LH, Pirotta MV, Raval M. Breastfeeding--evidence based guidelines for the use of medicines. Aust Fam Physician. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  4. Mitrano JA, Spooner LM, Belliveau P. Excretion of antimicrobials used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections during lactation: safety in breastfeeding infants. Pharmacotherapy. 2009 Sep;29(9):1103-9. Abstract
  5. Nahum GG, Uhl K, Kennedy DL. Antibiotic use in pregnancy and lactation: what is and is not known about teratogenic and toxic risks. Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Abstract
  6. Mahadevan U, Kane S. American gastroenterological association institute technical review on the use of gastrointestinal medications in pregnancy. Gastroenterology. 2006 Jul;131(1):283-311. Review. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  7. Chin KG, Mactal-Haaf C, McPherson CE. Use of anti-infective agents during lactation: Part 1--Beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, quinupristin-dalfopristin, and linezolid. J Hum Lact. 2000 Abstract
  8. Reyes MP, Ostrea EM Jr, Cabinian AE, Schmitt C, Rintelmann W. Vancomycin during pregnancy: does it cause hearing loss or nephrotoxicity in the infant? Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1989 Abstract

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e-lactancia is a resource recommended by Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine from United States of America

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