Last update: Aug. 26, 2014

Carbenia Benedicta

Very Low Risk for breastfeeding


Safe. Compatible.
Not risky for breastfeeding or infant.

The whole herb is used. It contains lactones, flavonoids, tannins and minerals. Unproven effects are: orexigenic and carminative. Indications according to Commission E of German Ministry of Health: anorexia, dyspepsia. Maximal dose: 6 g/day. It may cause vomiting and digestive irritation.

Alternatives

We do not have alternatives for Carbenia Benedicta since it is relatively safe.

Suggestions made at e-lactancia are done by APILAM´s pediatricians and pharmacists, and are based on updated scientific publications.
It is not intended to replace the relationship you have with your doctor but to compound it.

Jose Maria Paricio, Founder & President of APILAM/e-Lactancia

Your contribution is essential for this service to continue to exist. We need the generosity of people like you who believe in the benefits of breastfeeding.

Thank you for helping to protect and promote breastfeeding.

José María Paricio, founder of e-lactancia.

Other names

Carbenia Benedicta is also known as Blessed Thistle. Here it is a list of alternative known names::


Group

Carbenia Benedicta belongs to this group or family:

Tradenames

Main tradenames from several countries containing Carbenia Benedicta in its composition:

  • Bittner™. Contains other elements than Carbenia Benedicta in its composition
  • Pervivo™. Contains other elements than Carbenia Benedicta in its composition

References

  1. ABM: Brodribb W. ABM Clinical Protocol #9: Use of Galactogogues in Initiating or Augmenting Maternal Milk Production, Second Revision 2018. Breastfeed Med. 2018 Jun;13(5):307-314 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  2. Sim TF, Sherriff J, Hattingh HL, Parsons R, Tee LB. The use of herbal medicines during breastfeeding: a population-based survey in Western Australia. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2013 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  3. Forinash AB, Yancey AM, Barnes KN, Myles TD. The use of galactogogues in the breastfeeding mother. Ann Pharmacother. 2012 Oct;46(10):1392-404. Abstract
  4. Mannion C, Mansell D. Breastfeeding self-efficacy and the use of prescription medication: a pilot study. Obstet Gynecol Int. 2012;2012:562704. Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  5. ABM. Academy Of Breastfeeding Medicine Protocol Committee. ABM Clinical Protocol #9: Use of galactogogues in initiating or augmenting the rate of maternal milk secretion (First Revision January 2011). Breastfeed Med. 2011 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  6. Muresan M. Successful relactation--a case history. Breastfeed Med. 2011 Abstract
  7. ABM. Comité de Protocolos de la Academia Médica de Lactancia Materna. ABM Protocolo Clínico #9: Uso de Galactogogos para Iniciar o aumentar la tasa de secreción de Leche Materna. Breastfeed Med. 2011 Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  8. Bryant CA. Nursing the adopted infant. J Am Board Fam Med. 2006 Abstract Full text (link to original source) Full text (in our servers)
  9. Ayers JF. The use of alternative therapies in the support of breastfeeding. J Hum Lact. 2000 Abstract

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